jimzub:

Hard to believe it’s finally here: Wayward #1 arrives in comic shops today.
For the past 10 months, Steve and I have been developing this creator-owned series and it’s an incredible feeling to finally see it out in the world. We hope you read it, enjoy it, and tell others all about it.
Projects like this are not just one person and although it’s common for me to say “my new creator-owned book” that’s not accurate. Beyond the fact that Steve and I are co-creators on this, there are quite a number of people I need to thank for their involvement and support.
Steve Cummings, thank you for working alongside me to develop this story and drawing your heart out. Your incredible dedication shows on every page.John Rauch, thank you for enhancing Steve’s pages with incredible color and atmosphere.Marshall Dillon, thank you for always sticking with me and doing more proofs on this issue than any other project we’ve worked on together. You tirelessly made lettering edits right up until we went to press.Zack Davisson, thank you for your Japanese mythology consultation and wonderful essay back matter material.
Our variant cover artists: Alina Urusov, Jeff “Chamba” Cruz, Adam Warren, Tamra Bonvillain, Ross A. Campbell, Erik Larsen, Chip Zdarsky, and Kalman Andrasofszky. Thank you for creating eye-popping artwork to help grab attention, near and far.
Eric Stephenson, Ron Richards, Kat Salazar, Meredith Wallace, Addison Duke, Jonathon Chan, Branwyn Bigglestone and everyone else at the Image Comics office. Thank you for your support and your role as a creator-owned publisher that truly empowers creators to make the books they’ve always dreamed of.
Thank you also to:Charles Soule, for your invaluable advice and support.Nishi Makoto, for Japanese language/lettering help.Chris Butcher and the Beguiling, for arranging the Wayward launch party (happening tonight!).Brandon Seifert, for introducing me to Zack.
Thank you to the many retailers who have gone above and beyond the call of duty to support Wayward, including Happy Harbor Comics, Strange Adventures, Third Eye Comics, and the Phantom retail group.
Last but not least, thank you to my family and friends. Thank you for listening, sharing, understanding, and patiently accepting stressful days and neurotic nights as we built momentum to get this out the door. None of this would be possible without your love.
We’ve set up a fan email address where you can let us know what you think of Wayward (and we’re compiling the letters page for issue #2 this week, so please send us messages ASAP). Email waywardpostage@gmail.com and include “OK To Print” with your message if you’re okay with us possibly including your letter in a future issue.

I like to think that Jim Zub got me WAYWARD for my birthday, though of course, he made it for all of us. For my birthday.

jimzub:

Hard to believe it’s finally here: Wayward #1 arrives in comic shops today.

For the past 10 months, Steve and I have been developing this creator-owned series and it’s an incredible feeling to finally see it out in the world. We hope you read it, enjoy it, and tell others all about it.

Projects like this are not just one person and although it’s common for me to say “my new creator-owned book” that’s not accurate. Beyond the fact that Steve and I are co-creators on this, there are quite a number of people I need to thank for their involvement and support.

Steve Cummings, thank you for working alongside me to develop this story and drawing your heart out. Your incredible dedication shows on every page.
John Rauch, thank you for enhancing Steve’s pages with incredible color and atmosphere.
Marshall Dillon, thank you for always sticking with me and doing more proofs on this issue than any other project we’ve worked on together. You tirelessly made lettering edits right up until we went to press.
Zack Davisson, thank you for your Japanese mythology consultation and wonderful essay back matter material.

Our variant cover artists: Alina Urusov, Jeff “Chamba” Cruz, Adam Warren, Tamra Bonvillain, Ross A. Campbell, Erik Larsen, Chip Zdarsky, and Kalman Andrasofszky. Thank you for creating eye-popping artwork to help grab attention, near and far.

Eric Stephenson, Ron Richards, Kat Salazar, Meredith Wallace, Addison Duke, Jonathon Chan, Branwyn Bigglestone and everyone else at the Image Comics office. Thank you for your support and your role as a creator-owned publisher that truly empowers creators to make the books they’ve always dreamed of.

Thank you also to:
Charles Soule, for your invaluable advice and support.
Nishi Makoto, for Japanese language/lettering help.
Chris Butcher and the Beguiling, for arranging the Wayward launch party (happening tonight!).
Brandon Seifert, for introducing me to Zack.

Thank you to the many retailers who have gone above and beyond the call of duty to support Wayward, including Happy Harbor ComicsStrange AdventuresThird Eye Comics, and the Phantom retail group.

Last but not least, thank you to my family and friends. Thank you for listening, sharing, understanding, and patiently accepting stressful days and neurotic nights as we built momentum to get this out the door. None of this would be possible without your love.

We’ve set up a fan email address where you can let us know what you think of Wayward (and we’re compiling the letters page for issue #2 this week, so please send us messages ASAP). Email 
waywardpostage@gmail.com
 and include “OK To Print” with your message if you’re okay with us possibly including your letter in a future issue.

I like to think that Jim Zub got me WAYWARD for my birthday, though of course, he made it for all of us. For my birthday.

“Hi! What do you look for in an RPG — and how does that differ between video-game RPGs and tabletop RPGs for you?”

camharr:

Hi! I have a pretty low bar to clear for RPGs, be they tabletop or computer:

1. I can play as a woman. I don’t spend money on any game where my gender is not a playable option.

2. The systems make sense and are fun to fiddle with. For combat, I need to know how my powers and effects work, when I should use them, and when I shouldn’t. I’d better see non-combat mechanics as well: skills and checks based on socializing, exploring, understanding lore, and the like. Character management—don’t get me started. Give me half a chance, and I will min-max until the chocobos come home. I spend hours rolling a new character and then studying my inventory, sorting and comparing gear and usable items—even more so when I have a party to manage. I’m usually more excited to find a new merchant in a game than a new area to explore or plot point to absorb, because that means new items.

"Fiddle with" doesn’t mean deliberately trying to break the game or exploit its rules for my benefit, by the way. I just like tinkering, experimenting, and exploring edge cases—including the ones that put me at a disadvantage, just because I want to see what happens. (Yeah, squishy mage, go tank the dragon. You totally got this!)

3. The world is internally consistent and coherent. What I’d expect from any piece of fiction, not just a game. Cultures, geography, societies, names, environmental art, creatures, philosophies—the setting should feel like an actual world, and not just some cool features haphazardly stuck together with no thought to organic evolution and integration.

4. “Evil” is a valid and enjoyable path. This is more for video games than tabletop: if a game has an alignment system, the story told for the murkier options must be as engaging as the one for the lighter ones. I prefer to roleplay grey-to-black morality, and so I’m disappointed whenever a game gives the “good” path a deep, compelling epic and dumps off on the “bad” path a superficial, muahahaha-we’re-so-eeeeeevil story. Accordingly, my first time through a CRPG is always evil: either it’ll be well done, and I’ll have a great time; or it’ll be mishandled, and I’ll figure out how I would have done it differently, thereby honing my craft. (Note how this point fits in with the previous two. You can learn a lot from a game by how its systems and its story mesh together—or not.)

Sweet! camharr answered my question, sometimes colloquially called “an ask,” and so here’s an exclamation point: !

thehpalliance:

If you use YouTube, you need to know this.
You’ve heard all these rumblings about Net Neutrality over the past several months. Let’s get real: this is about controlling online video. It is estimated that by 2017, video content will account for 80-90% of all global Internet traffic.
This isn’t just about not being able to binge-watch a series on Netflix. It’s about the future of online video as we know it.
Whether your YouTube channel is home to daily vlogs, short films, or just that one video from when the cinnamon challenge seemed like a good idea, you’re a video creator. Your content and comments help shape this community. Let’s keep it that way.
Net Neutrality means that your YouTube videos reach people at the same speed as clips from last night’s episode of the Tonight Show. It means a level playing field for video creators looking to reach an audience. But new Net Neutrality rules could mess that up.
Here’s the deal: Telecommunications companies already charge us to access the Internet through our homes and our phones. New FCC rules could allow them to also charge content providers (like YouTube, Netflix, and even PBS) for access to our eyeballs. It could create a fast lane for Jimmy Fallon’s clips, and slow lane for your YouTube videos.
It is really important that the FCC understands that online video creators care about Net Neutrality. Even if you’ve only ever uploaded ONE VIDEO, you are a creator and you have a voice.
If you can, please add your channel to our petition. We’ll deliver this to the FCC in September and demonstrate that the online video community cares about this issue. 
Sign the petition, then spread the word.

thehpalliance:

If you use YouTube, you need to know this.

You’ve heard all these rumblings about Net Neutrality over the past several months. Let’s get real: this is about controlling online video. It is estimated that by 2017, video content will account for 80-90% of all global Internet traffic.

This isn’t just about not being able to binge-watch a series on Netflix. It’s about the future of online video as we know it.

Whether your YouTube channel is home to daily vlogs, short films, or just that one video from when the cinnamon challenge seemed like a good idea, you’re a video creator. Your content and comments help shape this community. Let’s keep it that way.

Net Neutrality means that your YouTube videos reach people at the same speed as clips from last night’s episode of the Tonight Show. It means a level playing field for video creators looking to reach an audience. But new Net Neutrality rules could mess that up.

Here’s the deal: Telecommunications companies already charge us to access the Internet through our homes and our phones. New FCC rules could allow them to also charge content providers (like YouTube, Netflix, and even PBS) for access to our eyeballs. It could create a fast lane for Jimmy Fallon’s clips, and slow lane for your YouTube videos.

It is really important that the FCC understands that online video creators care about Net Neutrality. Even if you’ve only ever uploaded ONE VIDEO, you are a creator and you have a voice.

If you can, please add your channel to our petition. We’ll deliver this to the FCC in September and demonstrate that the online video community cares about this issue.

Sign the petition, then spread the word.

Skullkickers #30 Reviews | Zub Tales4

The 30th issue of Skullkickers, the sterling and charming and zany and action-packed comic from Jim Zub, came out while I was at Gen Con last week. I’ve seen it — it exists and is real and is very lovely to read and regard.

This issue presents my pulp sci-fi story, “The Sky Countess of Jupiter,” by the way. One reviewer said my story was a perfect fit for Jim Zub’s work, which is the highest praise I can imagine here.

Anyway, you should get this issue and then all of the Skullkickers trades as Jim Zub heads into the series’ homestretch.

So, look, here’s a thing. The lies that depression tells us are insidious, undeniable, fearsome, dreadful. Frightening. They’re not simply told to us, they lay across our eyes and everything we perceive passes through them. Telling ourselves the depression isn’t right — isn’t accurate — feels like lying to ourselves.

Things can one day somehow be better? There’s hope? We’ve been well before and we can be again? We’re allowed to feel anything but what the disease tells us is insight — is truth? These feel like lies we recite to make ourselves feel better when we don’t feel right, feel correctly, feel the good, any good at all. Believing them can feel dishonest.

Here’s another lie we tell ourselves: That we should be capable of outsmarting it. That we should toughen up. That we should be enough to cope on our own because these signals are us. That everyone gets low, gets blue, gets sad, and if we were worthy we would simply get sorted out. We can know this is bullshit and believe it at the same time. At the same time.

It is hard to accept that I cannot always be the person I want to be. I cannot always be the person you tell me I can be.

I tell myself that I’ll power through, that I don’t have to make time for this chronic illness, that the worst is behind me. I don’t know that. That’s not how this works. I have to make concessions to this thing because it’s not going away.

It’s built into the air we breathe, these ideas. They’re invisible and they’re already inside.

I don’t know if this makes me lesser than, I hope not, but I know it means I can do and be less than I’m told I can be. That’s a hard thing to face. And there it is.

I sat on the floor, watched Robin Williams be a space alien, and learned that even as outsiders, even when weird, we can love and be loved.

We’ve laughed, we’ve sobbed, we’ve let poetry drip from our tongues like honey, and we’ve been human aliens, all at once. We saw it in him.

Let us sneak off to the cave, break loose from our bottles, remember each other’s memories, and wet our eyes with laughs and tears.