The Continuing Mission

Star Trek: The Next Generation is 25-years old this week. I gave myself the length of the soundtrack to the landmark two-parter, “Best of Both Worlds,” to write about it.

Thinking about The Next Generation (TNG) feels like recalling a favorite schoolteacher or remembering old dorm pals. I was nine when TNG debuted. I was, what, sixteen when it took its final bow in 1994.

I watched TNG on broadcast television, when the episodes were new. I watched it on video tapes, noting hints of the larger galactic backdrop and studying how the stories were built. I watched late-night re-runs of the show on the couch in my college dorm’s common area, canoodling with the woman who would become my wife.

Once, I was stoked with fervent fandom. I didn’t watch the show every week, I read it, text and subtext, drinking in what was on stage and behind the scenes. We had a subscription to Starlog at the house, when I was growing up, brimming with TNG news and interviews.

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lizlet:

waxjism:

cacchieressa:

justinhammer:

Star Trek XIII - A Whale of a Time

WHALES. NUCLEAR VESSELS. DOUBLE DUMBASS ON YOU. BEST MOVIE.

my wife points out that since transparent aluminum exists they HAVE to go back and get the whales, b/c Scotty is the one who gives the nineties ppl the formula for that. A WHALE OF A TIME A GO GO!

Ohmigod.

When I worked at the video store, I learned that STIV is properly called The One With The Whales. 
For the next jaunt back to the 1980s, the new crew should do it in a Bond-like pre-credits sequence. Just come back, drop off the whales, make the probe happy, and then, BOOM, Giacchino’s score over a bold title sequence. Then on with the new story.

lizlet:

waxjism:

cacchieressa:

justinhammer:

Star Trek XIII - A Whale of a Time

WHALES. NUCLEAR VESSELS. DOUBLE DUMBASS ON YOU. BEST MOVIE.

my wife points out that since transparent aluminum exists they HAVE to go back and get the whales, b/c Scotty is the one who gives the nineties ppl the formula for that. A WHALE OF A TIME A GO GO!

Ohmigod.

When I worked at the video store, I learned that STIV is properly called The One With The Whales. 

For the next jaunt back to the 1980s, the new crew should do it in a Bond-like pre-credits sequence. Just come back, drop off the whales, make the probe happy, and then, BOOM, Giacchino’s score over a bold title sequence. Then on with the new story.

Surprise Attack

A piece of music called “Surprise Attack,” from James Horner’s musical score to Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan came on via iTunes a few moments ago. With it came memories, beamed back to my brain after time spent on an away mission, of me sitting in my first office-style swivel chair, in my room as a boy, issuing commands to an imaginary bridge crew and battling the hostile starships of Klingons, Romulans, and made-up aliens of my own devising.

I banged my palm on the armrest. I made a fist as I gave the order: “Fire photon torpedoes!” I whispered to indicate (to myself) the responses from my loyal crew. (“They’re coming around for another pass, sir!” and “Shields at 71%!”)

Helm, hard to starboard. Bring us about. Target their engines and fire phasers.

Then I realized that as recently as this morning, on Twitter, I was using what was essentially the Mutara nebula as a metaphor for diving deep, going offline, and getting work done.

Geek is as geek does.