1. Reblogged from: kellysue
  2. First, forget inspiration. Habit is more dependable. Habit will sustain you whether you’re inspired or not … Forget talent. If you have it, fine. Use it. If you don’t have it, it doesn’t matter. As habit is more dependable than inspiration, continued learning is more dependable than talent … Finally, don’t worry about imagination. You have all the imagination you need … Persist.
    from “Furor Scribendi” by Octavia Butler (via blackwomensaid)
    Reblogged from: lizlet
  3. Seventeen People

    gameplaywright:

    You want a magnificent, beautiful, worthy analysis of a great story? I give you Jon White’s “Seventeen People,” a spectacular analysis of his favorite hour of television.

    Required reading for you screenwriters, fans of The West Wing, haters of Dire Bochcoization, and dual-classed (or wannabe dual-classed) writer-designers.

    Reblogged from: gameplaywright
  4. Anybody who writes knows you don’t simply write what you believe. You write to find out what you believe, or what you can afford to believe.
    Reblogged from: maxistentialist
  5. Making it official: Will Hindmarch’s new role

    protagonistlabs:

    Will Hindmarch has been a part of Storium since its earliest days. He was one of my first allies on this project, back when this was all just a big idea and a very rough prototype, and he formally signed-on as our first advisor over a year ago.

    But for quite some time now, Will has been…

    Reblogged from: protagonistlabs
  6. » Skullkickers #30 Solicitation Skullkickers

    My first widely available comics story hits the shelves in August as a part of Jim Zub’s stellar “Tavern Tales Through Time” issue of his exemplary Skullkickers comic! Go and tell your local comic shop that you want this issue — and every trade of Skullkickers — because this series is taking all of us readers on a remarkable and hilarious adventure you don’t want to miss.

    Onward.

  7. That’s why I’m interested in Storium, a web based card game inspired by ideas from pen and paper RPGs like Fiasco, FATE and Apocalypse World. It’s a game in which the players collaboratively tell a story and the computer only exists to do the housekeeping and ensure they play by the rules. It’s a game where everyone is an author, not an actor, and you don’t play to win, you play to find out what happens.
    Reblogged from: jaybushman
  8. jimzub:

The new creator-owned series I’ve been mentioning… Yeah.
Please start getting excited (and share the teaser with your friends)!
More details and art coming soon…

I’m just going to set these dollars here on my desk, ready to pick up Jim Zub’s new title as soon as it streets.

    jimzub:

    The new creator-owned series I’ve been mentioning… Yeah.

    Please start getting excited (and share the teaser with your friends)!

    More details and art coming soon…

    I’m just going to set these dollars here on my desk, ready to pick up Jim Zub’s new title as soon as it streets.

    Reblogged from: jimzub
  9. wilwheaton:

    Guest Post by Will Hindmarch: Learning to Write

    When the writing is tough, I doubt a lot of my words and think hard about whether I really know what I’m doing or not. Where do I get the nerve to try to be heard or read?

    As David Simon once put it, who died and made me Storyteller?

    Thinking back to some of the lessons I’ve learned as a writer and narrative designer, I think about all the hours I’ve logged — through doubt and confidence, pain…

    View On WordPress

    Reblogged from: wilwheaton
  10. Game Story, Six Gilled Sharks and The Quest For the Narrative Fix-A-Flat

    rdansky:

    Every couple of years, we get one of these. And by “these”, I mean “some distinguished gentleman from outside the game industry announces that games aren’t/can’t be art”, and everyone goes nuts as a result. A couple of years ago it was the late Roger Ebert, whose argument could largely be summed…

    Reblogged from: rdansky
Next

The Gist is a Blog

Paper theme built by Thomas